Professional License Law

Licensees and license applicants are usually aware that criminal convictions can cause them problems with state agencies.  As we’ve discussed on this blog before, even expunged convictions show up on a rap sheet, and licensing agencies have the statutory authority to require that the conviction be disclosed.  What licensees often don’t realize is

As of 2012, the Department of Real Estate now requires its licensed brokers and real estate salespersons to report certain “adverse events” to the Department.  Business and Professions Code §10186.2 requires a licensee to make a report, in writing, within 30 days if any of the following occur:

–         A licensee is charged with a

When the Department of Real Estate seeks to discipline a licensee or deny a license application, it is required by California law to establish specific “criteria for rehabilitation.”  These criteria are very important to understand for licensees and applicants.  Essentially, by publishing these criteria, the Department of Real Estate (DRE) provides a statutory

Since the passage of the SAFE Act in 2008 and the subsequently enacted legislation in California, real estate professionals and employees of California finance lenders who want to originate home loans in California must apply for a Mortgage Loan Originator (MLO) endorsement through the Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System & Registry (NMLS).

For licensees and applicants

The California Department of Insurance wields arguably the most powerful licensing law in California, California Insurance Code section 1669.  Section 1669, which applies to applicants but also to existing insurance broker licenses through a related statute, empowers the Commissioner to summarily deny or summarily revoke (without a hearing) an insurance broker license for a felony

In California, the Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH) hears all professional license discipline or denial cases, except for liquor license and attorney discipline hearings.  The same administrative court hears cases for such varied occupations as physicians, architects, dentists, insurance brokers and engineers.  A panel of about 75 administrative law judges (ALJs), working our of four