The Board of Registered Nursing accused our client of gross negligence and incompetence in the practice of nursing following alleged failure to obtain or document a specific reading with respect to a patient under her care. To resolve the case, our client was willing to enter into a public letter of reproval, but the Board

Our firm represented an applicant to the California Department of Insurance who had applied for a Property and Casualty Broker-Agent License for the second time, after previously being denied in 2017.  The applicant had three convictions: two for receiving stolen property, and one for unauthorized use of identity, between 2010 and 2012.  The 2017 application

Our office represented a licensee in 2020 who had earned a license only two years prior, in 2018.  Unfortunately, this client was arrested for DUI just a few months after earning the license, and ultimately pled guilty in 2019.  Having only been licensed for a year at the time of conviction, the client did not

In 2019, we represented a licensee of the Department of Insurance who had previously held a restricted license due to a criminal conviction.  After the initial restrictions were lifted, the client was disciplined twice by FINRA, revoked in another state, and had an application denied in yet another state. The client failed to notify DOI

Our office represented a registered nurse in 2019 who had suffered discipline from a registered nursing state agency outside of California.  The allegations were that the nurse had admitted to a substance abuse dependency and was subject to five years of monitoring in the other state due to that admission.  The California Board of Registered

A physician client came to Ray & Bishop, PLC, after receiving a Statement of Issues from the California Medical Board alleging that the client had a history of substance abuse and mental health concerns.  The California Medical Board obtained the client’s medical history, and using the medical records from prior hospitals, alleged that the client

Out-of-state discipline is a common basis for California license discipline, under the applicable statutes that allow the Board of Registered Nursing to seek collateral discipline against a licensee who is disciplined or censured by another state’s licensing entity (even when the licensing entity is not necessarily a nursing board). In this case, our client was

In a recent contested case against the Physical Therapy Board applicant, the Board’s attorneys insisted that because a ten-year-old theft conviction was not properly disclosed on an application for licensure, our prospective Physical Therapy Aide client did not deserve a license at all. After an administrative hearing where the facts and circumstances of the conviction