California Nurse Licensing

Recently we shared our insight about the professional consequences of getting a DUI for a California registered nurse.  We wanted to share with you some recent feedback we received from a registered nurse who had the same struggles we discussed in our article:

From February 13, 2017:

“I am an RN who was convicted of

It only takes a split-second of bad judgment for a registered nurse to get behind the wheel of a car after consuming some alcohol, but the professional consequences can be severe and last a lifetime.  Any nurse with a DUI arrest can attest to the painful, humiliating consequences of being dragged before a judge and

We have successfully saved many RNs in California from license revocation after serious, lengthy Accusations were filed against them.  As a consequence of a pattern of convictions or a serious mistake, RNs often have to serve a period of probation with the Board of Registered Nursing.  The most common length of a probation term is

Nurses who work in late-stage care, either in palliative care or in hospice care, should be aware that all nurses, both registered and licensed vocational nurses, are considered mandatory reporters in California.  Under the Welfare and Institutions Code, anybody who has “full or intermittent” responsibility for patient care in a facility “shall report” anything that

The California Board of Registered Nursing has made important changes to the duty of a nurse to report a criminal conviction or other license discipline and to cooperate with the Board’s investigation of that conviction.  We have begun to see Board staff implement this new law in 2016. 

Under Title 16 California Code of Regulations

Because of our expertise and the sheer amount of material available on our website and blog, our office often hears from prospective registered nurses and licensed vocational nurses, sometimes even before they apply to nursing school.  For young people considering a career in nursing, it’s never been more important to stay out of trouble before

Investigations of alleged misconduct by California registered nurses are investigated by two agencies, either the Board of Registered Nursing, by its own investigators, or by the Division of Investigation of the Department of Consumer Affairs.  When a complaint is received by the Board, if Board enforcement believes the complaint has sufficient merit, the complaint is

We have had great success in securing full non-probationary licenses, with just a citation placed on the record at license issuance, for licensed vocational nurse applicants with prior criminal records.  The key to this success has been demonstrating our clients’ rehabilitation to show the Board that a probationary license or license denial was not necessary

Among the thousands of applicants who seek to become a registered nurse in the state of California each year, hundreds have criminal convictions or other adverse actions (such as other license discipline) of some kind in their background.  A license applicant with a criminal conviction or other adverse action typically has three obstacles to clear