Out-of-state discipline is a common basis for California license discipline, under the applicable statutes that allow the Board of Registered Nursing to seek collateral discipline against a licensee who is disciplined or censured by another state’s licensing entity (even when the licensing entity is not necessarily a nursing board). In this case, our client was

One of our registered nursing clients suffered a panic attack during an episode of post-partum depression.  Her husband phoned the police to help deescalate the conflict, but it unfortunately led to her arrest on suspicion of domestic violence.  Although the charges were dropped, our client was questioned by the Board, given employment releases to sign,

Our registered nurse client was accused of physically assaulting a patient and verbally abusing him while on duty at the client’s hospital.  The problem?  The only evidence of the so-called “assault” came from the patient, who had a history of psychosis and whose complaint was authored by another RN.  No other witnesses had anything negative

Our client, the owner and operator of a family day care, was threatened with license revocation because of a criminal conviction suffered by her husband that occurred at the family home.  The husband plead guilty to domestic violence against our client.  The Department of Social Services, Community Care Licensing, refused to grant the husband a

Our firm just received a decision from the fourth consecutive disciplinary case against a physician by the Medical Board of California.  The physician was already on probation, and in two prior cases, the physician’s probation had been extended.  The Board accused the physician of misconduct while on probation, and forced the physician to make statements

In early 2013 we tried a case involving a criminal conviction suffered by a California insurance producer.  The insurance producer had been convicted of misdemeanor child abuse.  The allegations in the police report, introduced into evidence at hearing, were sensational, alleging multiple acts and a past pattern of wrongdoing.  The Department took the position that